You Can Feel Jesus In Your Bones.

I read a story once about how a woman, who was deaf from birth, listened to music.

She would turn a record up really loud and place her hands on the speakers, until she could feel the vibrations move into her chest and overtake her body. The rhythms would eventually articulate and she could fill in the melody with her mind.

Knowing Jesus Christ is like that.

We’ve all heard the mockery in people’s voices when they talk about someone who has “gotten religion” or is “high on Jesus.” It’s not their fault; they just don’t know you can feel Jesus in your bones. They don’t know it’s possible for a deaf person to “hear.”

But it is.

When people shouted at me about Jesus, I couldn’t hear them because I was deaf; but I wasn’t blind and I could see they were shouting, which made me resent them.

But when I finally put my hands on that Bible and read it, I was surprised by the tiny hum that rose in my chest. As I read more, the hum grew stronger and engaged my heart, my imagination and my gratitude. When I read more, the drums picked up and created rhythm; the cellos formed a baseline and the violins and piccolos chimed in with a melody. All together now this internal orchestra has surged into something fine and true that I really want to share.

But try as I might I can’t explain it to you. You have to put your hands on the speakers until you can feel it in your own bones. Then you’ll know.

English: The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra's 7...

The Israel Philharmonic (Wikipedia)

Some people like Bob Goff, Joyce Meyer, Matthew Barnett, Chris Caine and Nancy Alcorn, play gorgeous music with their lives, but I’m still a young orchestra, and I’m sometimes pitchy or behind.

However, I’ve committed to practice and to follow the world’s greatest conductor, who promises the more I practice the finer my music will become. He is the most reliable speaker upon which to place your hands.

So with that, here is my tiny, little solo – a birthday present for Him.

I am raising money to counter human trafficking in SE Asia with The Exodus Road. In a week, we have raised nearly 30% of our $1400 goal. We have until Christmas.

The Exodus Road is playing some beautiful music right now. Please put your hands on their speakers, and when you’re done, put them in your pockets and help them play more.

How To Kick In A Brothel Door.

fe7d01e06393a470e3d8445b0f5d4497Imagine for a second, your 16-year-old daughter is going to a job interview. You’re excited about that until hours pass and she hasn’t returned, nor is she answering her phone. You start to panic and call her friends and they haven’t heard from her either.

What you don’t know is the man she met was a human trafficker, posing as a business owner. He drugged her, threw her in a van and slipped her across an international border. Now, she’s locked in a room, possibly chained to a bed, with no phone or drivers license in a country whose language she doesn’t speak.

And there are a line of 20 men standing outside waiting to rape her.

This is so horrifying, your entire life stops. You host press conferences, social media blasts, work with private investigators and law enforcement, but what if you were poor and had no access to those resources? What if the cops you called were wearing a badge but working for the traffickers?

Wouldn’t you pray that somebody who had money, access to social media and the support of a scrupulous police force would help rescue your daughter? Wouldn’t you pray that some organization like The Exodus Road would kick in the door of just the right brothel and find her?

The Exodus Road is doing this in SE Asia. The A21 campaign is doing it in Greece and Eastern Europe. If you donate to my Exodus Road fund you are doing it from wherever you are. You are not standing by horrified as little girls and boys are bought and sold. You are officially part of the solution.

A21 says it like this: Nobody can do everything, but everyone can do something.

Will you click the link and put $10 into the fund right now? Will you refuse to be paralyzed by the scope of this problem?

We’ve raised 10% of the money we need to fund one raid on a brothel in SE Asia, and I am amazed at that. I don’t even know most of the people who donated and yesterday got our first male supporter – thank you John!

We have two and a half weeks to raise the rest of the money. Will you help me? Giving money is the easiest thing ever and Jesus had this to say about it:

Give, and it will be given unto you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. Luke 6:38

This Isn’t Charity. This is War.

I’m not fundraising for The Exodus Road to make myself feel good at Christmas. Nope. I’m doing it to kick some #!* that desperately needs kicking and I am asking you to put your boots on and help me.

One awesome thing about being American, or Canadian, or Japanese, or Australian or European is, our nations use globally traded currencies, which are considered reliable stores of value (um, usually.) It is called hard currency.

Pha That Luang, Vientiane, Laos

Pha That Luang, Vientiane, Laos

Due to fiscal or political instability, many nations in Southeast Asia use currencies, which fluctuate too much to be a reliable store of value. They are called soft currencies. This is one reason two of us could eat a three-course meal in Vientiane, Laos and pay an average of $12.

Hard currency is coveted in nations with soft ones, so when you spend dollars or euros in SE Asia, for whatever reason, it is like dropping Navy Seal Team Six into a neighborhood bar fight.

Powerful things happen.

This is part of the reason pimps in Southeast Asia court Western sickos flush with hard currency. Selling woman and children in dollars or euro makes a local pimp wealthy exponentially faster than his neighbors who sell chicken in the market for Lao Kip.

For the same reason, organizations like The Exodus Road, on the ground in SE Asia, are courting you too. They can, among other things, take your US dollars and convert them into a breathtaking number of Rupees or Kip or Riel to pay local people a living wage to join the fight against human trafficking. Between borders

You are so powerful. Do you get that?

Don’t donate to my Exodus Road fund today because you are a nice person and it’s Christmas. Don’t do it because you need the write-off.

Do it because you are mad about this graphic. Do it because you want to put the hurt on these dirtbags who make a living through unconscionable crimes against women and children.

Don’t wait. Drop a hard currency bomb right now.

This is war.

The Exodus Road is a coalition of covert investigators and organizations working together to fight human trafficking through interventions. We gather legal evidence, support raids and prosecutions and support aftercare facilities in our networks.