How To Free A Sex Slave. Part 1

This is the story of a real 15-year-old girl, sold into sexual slavery in SE Asia. Part one, today, is about her. Part two, tomorrow, is about the coalition of investigators, NGO’s, and volunteers working through The Exodus Road to free her and eight others.

We have raised more than 30% of our $1400 goal to fund a brothel raid. Thank you! We have exactly two weeks left. I know every charity in the world is asking for money right now, but if it moves you that there are more slaves now than at any other time in human history, jump in with a ten, twenty or a hundred and become a part of the solution.

We met Sarah in a brothel in Cambodia.

There was a line of prostitutes behind a glass wall, a fishbowl they call it. They were sitting on high bar stools, with heavy make-up and short skirts, numbers pinned to their shoulders, displayed for the customers on the other side of the glass.

And then, they brought in Sarah. She was “fresh,” the pimp had told our lead investigator over the phone. Sarah was dressed in street clothes, head down, hands fiddling nervously with a napkin. She was 15 and had been sold by her mother in a neighboring country several days before to work off a debt which her mother owed. Sarah’s virginity had been sold three days prior for $600 USD.

Sarah could not speak the local language, was kept under close watch daily, and had no access to a cell phone or any communication from the outside world. She had been slipped illegally across borders by a system of traffickers that has become a global highway of modern day slaves.

With covert cameras, our investigators were able to record the sale of Sarah for the night, capturing valuable evidence that could be passed on to the trusted authorities in hopes of the pimp’s prosecution. Later, behind a closed door, our operative was able to call a social worker who spoke Sarah’s language. He explained that he was there to help her, not to hurt her, and that he could aid her escape if she wanted. Unfortunately, Sarah was too scared to run, too scared to trust a stranger, understandably.

The following day, our investigator returned to visit Sarah in the brothel, just blocks away from a crowded local market. She scribbled a note, “Please Rescue Me,” on a bill and slipped it to him.

She wanted out, but didn’t know the way.

Immediately, our investigator gave his testimony and video evidence to the authorities and asked the government to conduct a raid on Sarah’s behalf. It was believed that 10 or more girls were also being held against their wills at the same brothel where we found Sarah.

Want to find out what happened? Donate $20 to the non-profit Exodus Road and tune in tomorrow.

 

How To Kick In A Brothel Door.

fe7d01e06393a470e3d8445b0f5d4497Imagine for a second, your 16-year-old daughter is going to a job interview. You’re excited about that until hours pass and she hasn’t returned, nor is she answering her phone. You start to panic and call her friends and they haven’t heard from her either.

What you don’t know is the man she met was a human trafficker, posing as a business owner. He drugged her, threw her in a van and slipped her across an international border. Now, she’s locked in a room, possibly chained to a bed, with no phone or drivers license in a country whose language she doesn’t speak.

And there are a line of 20 men standing outside waiting to rape her.

This is so horrifying, your entire life stops. You host press conferences, social media blasts, work with private investigators and law enforcement, but what if you were poor and had no access to those resources? What if the cops you called were wearing a badge but working for the traffickers?

Wouldn’t you pray that somebody who had money, access to social media and the support of a scrupulous police force would help rescue your daughter? Wouldn’t you pray that some organization like The Exodus Road would kick in the door of just the right brothel and find her?

The Exodus Road is doing this in SE Asia. The A21 campaign is doing it in Greece and Eastern Europe. If you donate to my Exodus Road fund you are doing it from wherever you are. You are not standing by horrified as little girls and boys are bought and sold. You are officially part of the solution.

A21 says it like this: Nobody can do everything, but everyone can do something.

Will you click the link and put $10 into the fund right now? Will you refuse to be paralyzed by the scope of this problem?

We’ve raised 10% of the money we need to fund one raid on a brothel in SE Asia, and I am amazed at that. I don’t even know most of the people who donated and yesterday got our first male supporter – thank you John!

We have two and a half weeks to raise the rest of the money. Will you help me? Giving money is the easiest thing ever and Jesus had this to say about it:

Give, and it will be given unto you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. Luke 6:38

This Isn’t Charity. This is War.

I’m not fundraising for The Exodus Road to make myself feel good at Christmas. Nope. I’m doing it to kick some #!* that desperately needs kicking and I am asking you to put your boots on and help me.

One awesome thing about being American, or Canadian, or Japanese, or Australian or European is, our nations use globally traded currencies, which are considered reliable stores of value (um, usually.) It is called hard currency.

Pha That Luang, Vientiane, Laos

Pha That Luang, Vientiane, Laos

Due to fiscal or political instability, many nations in Southeast Asia use currencies, which fluctuate too much to be a reliable store of value. They are called soft currencies. This is one reason two of us could eat a three-course meal in Vientiane, Laos and pay an average of $12.

Hard currency is coveted in nations with soft ones, so when you spend dollars or euros in SE Asia, for whatever reason, it is like dropping Navy Seal Team Six into a neighborhood bar fight.

Powerful things happen.

This is part of the reason pimps in Southeast Asia court Western sickos flush with hard currency. Selling woman and children in dollars or euro makes a local pimp wealthy exponentially faster than his neighbors who sell chicken in the market for Lao Kip.

For the same reason, organizations like The Exodus Road, on the ground in SE Asia, are courting you too. They can, among other things, take your US dollars and convert them into a breathtaking number of Rupees or Kip or Riel to pay local people a living wage to join the fight against human trafficking. Between borders

You are so powerful. Do you get that?

Don’t donate to my Exodus Road fund today because you are a nice person and it’s Christmas. Don’t do it because you need the write-off.

Do it because you are mad about this graphic. Do it because you want to put the hurt on these dirtbags who make a living through unconscionable crimes against women and children.

Don’t wait. Drop a hard currency bomb right now.

This is war.

The Exodus Road is a coalition of covert investigators and organizations working together to fight human trafficking through interventions. We gather legal evidence, support raids and prosecutions and support aftercare facilities in our networks.